Posts Tagged ‘EAPG’

EAPG “Loop” goblet with metal base, c.1865

Sunday, September 20th, 2020

This EAPG (Early American Pattern Glass) water goblet in the Loop pattern, was made in America, c.1860-1870. It stands 5 inches high with a 3 inch opening, and is made of lead glass.

A tinker made a metal replacement base, sometime in the late 1880s to early 1900s, after the original base broke off. Judging by the advanced rust, it must have been neglected for some time. It now sits on a shelf alongside other glass goblets with inventive repairs, and I wouldn’t be surprised if they exchange war stories when I’m not around.

This goblet with the same Loop pattern still has its original base, but looks quite common next to my stalwart survivor.

Photo courtesy of the Early American Pattern Glass Society

Small compote with wood base, c.1915

Sunday, July 19th, 2020

This small EAPG (Early American Pattern Glass) compote or candy dish was made in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, by the United States Glass Co., c.1915. Made affordable to the masses by simulating more expensive cut glass, EAPG was immediately popular and thousands of patterns were manufactured in every conceivable shape and style. This example is in the Australian Sweetmeat pattern and stands 6 inches high with a 4.5 inch opening.

At some point in its early life, the cover went missing and the glass base broke off. A replacement base, made from 2 pieces of carved wood, was most likely created at home. Originally painted black, the octagonal shape mimics the pattern in the glass.

This compote of similar form and pattern suggests with the original cover and base on mine might have looked like.

Photo courtesy of Early American Pattern Glass Society

“Stippled Medallion” glass spooner, c.1865

Sunday, April 28th, 2019

I purchased this humble flint EAPG (Early American Pattern Glass) spooner in the Stippled Medallion pattern many years ago while visiting Mark’s aunt and uncle in Framingham, Massachusetts. It was made by Union Glass Company in Somerville, Massachusetts, just 20 miles northeast of Framingham, between 1860 and 1870. It measures 5.5 inches high, and has a diameter of 3.5 inches. After its original base snapped off, a simple turned wood base was made (most likely at home) and the spooner was returned to the dining table and put back to use.

I spotted it at an antiques shop,¬†sitting on a shelf among other “perfect” glassware, with a faded price tag of around $10. I assume it had been gathering dust on that shelf for many years, watching as dozens of nearby pieces came and went, feeling as an orphan must feel seeing others taken away to start a new life. It’s a good thing I found it and added it to my collection, or else it might still be sitting on that shelf, anxiously eying each customer and hoping “maybe this is the one…”

This example still has its original base and shows what mine looked like before the crash.

www.ebay.com

Photo courtesy of eBay