Archive for the ‘anecdotal’ Category

Pots in Action

Sunday, May 23rd, 2021

In 2005 I was asked by ceramic artist Ayumi Horie to submit images for Pots in Action, a new Instagram page she was creating. The objective was to show ceramics in use, and she thought it would be fun to show some of my wounded survivors. These are the results, photographed by my talented husband Mark. I’m thrilled with how they came out and hope you like them as much as I do. Thank you Ayumi and Mark!

Kintsugi: The Poetic Mend

Sunday, March 21st, 2021

Kintsugi: The Poetic Mend by Bonnie Kemske has just been published and I am sure that anyone who enjoys my blog will enjoy reading this well written and informative book. It’s beautifully printed, with extensive colorful photos and historical information. There is even a section showing the step-by-step kintsugi process, which is fascinating.

I am pleased to have a ceramic plate with my own kintsugi repair featured in the first chapter, Cracks Made Whole In a Golden Repair.

Click on this link to see more photos and information of the plate: Kintsugi repair, at last!

…as well as another plate that I repaired: Family platter with kintsugi gold repair


Happy Valentine’s Day!

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

This is the only heart shaped metal brace I have seen. For more photos and details, please check out Heart-shaped metal brace on Chinese bowl, c.1770.

Happy Valentine’s Day, and if you happen to have a broken heart, I hope at least it is mending well with with staples, braces, or gold.

Happy Halloween, 2020!

Saturday, October 31st, 2020

Could 2020 have been any scarier? With the double whammy of the worldwide pandemic still threatening our lives during one of the most polarizing US presidential elections in history, I think not.

Here are some of the scariest victims of metal staple repairs in my collection, no doubt inspired by Frankenstein’s monster himself.

I’m going to assume the hidden side of the teacup is riddled with metal staples.

Have a spooktacular Halloween!

Boris Karloff photos courtesy of Universal Pictures

Happy Labor Day, 2020!

Sunday, September 6th, 2020

Thank you to all of the unnamed itinerant china & dish menders, tinkers, and repairers of all things broken throughout the world.

Happy 4th of July!

Sunday, July 5th, 2020

O, Say Can You See…these inventive repairs in patriotic colors?

I hope you enjoyed Independence Day weekend.

Floral Tribute

Sunday, May 31st, 2020

Those of you who know me well, know that I do not have a green thumb. But with lots of free time on my hands these days, I have taken the plunge and started to do a little bit of gardening. I’ve enjoyed planting flowers which (hopefully) the deer, groundhogs, chipmunks, and rabbits won’t eat. Let’s see how well that goes.

Inspired by my new activity, I am happy to present some of my favorite teapots with floral decoration.

Happy Mother’s Day, 2020!

Sunday, May 10th, 2020

Make-Do’s at the movies

Sunday, December 29th, 2019

As I work in the film industry as a set decorator, it’s nearly impossible for me not to scrutinize the decor when watching a movie or television series. Although it is fun to see what other decorators have done to help establish the characters, it has become a bit of a curse, as on occasion it distracts me from following the plot. As my eye wanders away from the actors and on to the set dressing seen in the background, I have spotted some interesting inventive repairs along the way.

Star Wars: The Rise of the Skywalker, 2019. Kintsugi helmet.

This past week I saw the latest Star Wars movie and immediately noticed a kintsugi helmet worn by Adam Driver as villain Kylo Ren. Jen Glennon writes in Inverse: “The Rise of Skywalker is finally here, bringing with it the return of Kylo Ren’s nouveau-Vader helmet, shattered during a Last Jedi tantrum. In the months leading up to the release of Episode IX, keen-eyed fans compared the visible red cracks on Kylo’s helmet to the Japanese practice of kintsugi, or mending broken objects with visible seams of gold or silver, transforming a break into a unique design element.” So glad to know that kintsugi has made its way into one of the world’s most popular movie franchises and is being seen by millions of people.


Mary Poppins Returns, 2018. Cracked Royal Doulton bowl.

After the Banks children accidentally break their mother’s beloved Royal Doulton bowl, Mary Poppins (Emily Blunt) takes the childern and the broken pieces to her cousin Topsy Turvey (Meryl Streep), a “woman who can fix anything,” to repair the damaged heirloom. Naturally, an elaborate song and dance involving broken antiques ensues.


The Crown, 2016. Mug with early replacement handle

During the first season of the sumptuous series The Crown, I spied with my little eye a Chinese porcelain covered mug with early metal replacement handle in Winston Churchill’s yellow-walled sitting room. The room is filled with many other pieces of antique ceramics, paintings and fine furniture. I wonder if Churchill actually owned antiques with inventive repairs or if the set decorator, Alison Harvey, added it in to help comment on the character.


The Piano, 1993. Make-do finger.

*Spoiler alert! This fantastic make-do hand prop (literally) is integral to the plot of Jane Campion’s masterful movie starring Holly Hunter as Ada McGrath. The polished silver steampunk appendage, seen at the end of the movie, allows Ada to play her beloved piano once again.

Happy Holidays!

Sunday, December 22nd, 2019

Wishing you a SMASHING Holiday Season!