Posts Tagged ‘metal handle’

Parian jug with ornate handle, c.1850

Sunday, March 6th, 2022

This unglazed Parian porcelain cream jug measures 3.5 inches high and is decorated with a molded relief design of water nymphs. Although I believe it was made in the mid-1800s, it has a later Art Nouveau feel to it. It is marked on the underside with the incised number 463.

There’s no doubt this is a lovey little jug, but it would be nothing without its ornate replacement handle, added after the original broke off. Typically I find small jugs such as this with simple metal tinker-make handles, so I was surprised to see such a fancy replacement. I appreciate the ingenuity of the repairer for attaching the top part of the new handle over the remains of the broken original and adding a band around the base, rather than drilling though the jug. Even though the original handle was much smaller than the replacement (see last photo), I much prefer the juxtaposition of the two material mashed up together on my unique jug.

Here’s an example of the jug with its original handle intact.

Photo courtesy of eBay

Lowestoft pearlware jug, c.1780

Sunday, January 23rd, 2022

I spotted this diminutive pear-shaped sparrow beak cream jug in an antiques shop in Dublin, Ireland in 2015. It is decorated with the Pagoda and Trees pattern, hand rendered in cobalt blue underglaze. A delicate lattice border embellishes the inside rim. Made in England by the Lowestoft factory around 1775-1785, the jug stands 3 inches high and has an incised number 4 on the underside.

After the original handle broke off over 200 years ago, a tinker made a metal replacement supported with horizontal and vertical straps, much like an iron girdle. Although the small but mighty jug is in poor condition, I felt compelled to rescue it and bring it back to America, where it now lives among friends with similar battle scars. 

This jug with similar form and decoration shows what the original handle on mine might have looked like.

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Photo courtesy of English Porcelain Online

Chinese teapot with puce flowers and metal handle, c.1760

Sunday, November 21st, 2021

This globular teapot with puce floral enamel decoration and orange bands was made in China in the middle to late 1700s. It measures 5.5 inches high, 7.5 inches from handle to spout. At some point in its early life, the handle broke off and a bronze replacement, with the remains of rattan wrapping, was attached. Most teapots I find have one form or another of metal handle protection to help insulate delicate hands from the hot contents. Many examples in my collection have intricately woven patterns using more than one color of rattan, and I imagine the customer would have been charged more for these finer artistic flourishes.

This teapot with similar form and decoration suggests what the original handle on my teapot might have looked like.

Photo courtesy of Hampshire Cultural Trust

Chelsea porcelain red anchor mug, c.1755

Sunday, October 31st, 2021

This bell-shaped Chelsea porcelain mug was made in England between 1752 and 1756. The superbly painted polychrome floral decoration was no doubt inspired by similar examples made by Meissen. A red anchor mark can be found on the underside.

At one point in the mugs early life, the original loop handle broke off and a metal replacement was attached. The simplicity and delicacy of the new handle, as well as the rich bronze color, make this mug even more appealing to me than if the original handle was still intact.

This mug with similar form and decoration suggests what the original handle on my mug might have looked like.

Photos courtesy of Scottish Antiques

Silver lustre cream jug with metal handle, c.1840

Saturday, August 7th, 2021

This silver lustre pottery cream jug with molded ribbing was made in England, c.1840. It measures 3.5 inches high, 6.5 inches wide.

Well over 100 years ago after the jug took a tumble, a metal replacement handle with crimped edges and an upper horizontal support strap was added by a tinsmith. Tin repairs such as this are perhaps the most common type of make-do repair and I have dozens of similar examples in my collection.

This silver lustre cream jug with similar form shows what the original handle on my jug may have looked like.

Photo courtesy of Catawiki

Chinese mug with metal & rattan handle, c.1785

Friday, July 2nd, 2021

I purchased this cylindrical form porcelain mug at auction last year, along with many lots of mugs, teapots, jugs, goblets, and oil lamps. As a result of my forced hiatus from work due to the pandemic, I was able to leisurely research and catalog the 50+ new pieces to my collection. This pretty mug in the Famille Rose palette has floral swag and tassel decoration in pink, purple, green, and orange. It was made in China during the Qianlong period (1736-95) and stands 4.5 inches high.

After the handle broke off, a bronze replacement was attached by carefully drilling through the body. Although I seem to have countless replacement handles such as this in my collection, each are a little different in size, proportion, and material. I especially enjoy the patterns created by the thinly cut rattan, woven over the handle as insulation and to help form a tighter grip.

This example, with similar form and decoration, shows what the original handle on my mug would have looked like before it took a tumble.

Photo courtesy of Ruby Lane

Barroom brawl survivor, c.1880

Sunday, June 20th, 2021

I’d like to imagine that this pewter tankard lost its original handle during a rowdy barroom brawl, sometime in the late 1800s. How else would you explain the sturdy metal handle becoming detached? One can only imagine the scenario of punching fists, smashed chairs, and flying drinking vessels. This survivor was most likely made in England at the end of the 19th century and measures 6.75 inches high with an opening of 3.75 inches. It has an engraved monogram of “DAO.”

After the broken tankard was picked up off of the barroom floor, it was was fitted with a thin metal replacement handle with thumb rest. Though diminutive in scale, the new handle does the trick in allowing the ale to be served again. This time men, please be more careful and leave the drinkware alone.

Photo courtesy of Invaluable

This example suggests what the original handle on my tankard might have looked like.

Photo courtesy of Ruby Lane

Jug with transfer decoration and unusual metal handle, c.1880

Sunday, May 9th, 2021

This sturdy transferware jug was made by Cork, Edge & Malkin of Burslem, England, as part of the Italy series. The red transfer design was registered on September 29, 1879. Jug stands 5.5 inches high and is stamped on the underside: “TRADE MARK, E.M & CO. B, ITALY.”

Although the durable earthenware seems likely to have withstood much wear and tear, somehow the handle became detached well over 100 years ago. To bring the jug back to life, a tinker created an unusual replacement handle using crimped tin and wire. By carefully attaching bands at the top and bottom, the handle was secured without drilling through the body, which might have resulted in further damage. Much thanks to the anonymous tinker who made this otherwise innocuous jug unique.

This jug with similar form and decoration shows what the original loop handle on my jug might have looked like.

Photo courtesy of Replacements, Ltd.

French faïence cider jug with metal handle & spout, c.1745

Sunday, April 11th, 2021

I bought this footed earthenware bulbous body jug at auction last year and although I didn’t know much about it, I knew it would be a great addition to my collection. Made from tin glazed redware pottery and decorated with flowers & scrollwork in white, blue, green, yellow, and rust glazes, it stands 8.75 inches high. I believe it was made in Rouen, France, c.1740-50.

Looks like this jug took a tumble quite a while ago. Rather than toss the jug out with the bathwater, it was brought to a handy metalsmith who fashioned an unusual metal spout/collar/ribbed handle combo. Although the appearance has been drastically altered by the metal addition, the jug is able to function again. I much prefer the look of this make-do jug over its “perfect” counterpart, but that’s just my opinion.

This jug with similar form suggests what the original handle and spout on my jug might have looked like.

Photo courtesy of WorthPoint

Blue mocha ware mug, c.1840

Saturday, March 6th, 2021

This cylindrical form mug was made in England around 1840. It is decorated with a blue field and thin dark brown bands on a cream ground. “IMPERIAL QUART” is printed in black transfer on the front. Mug measures 6 inches high with a diameter of 4.5 inches.

I’d like to imagine that the mug lost its handle as it was flung across the room during a heated bar brawl. Luckily, a clever tinsmith fashioned a replacement handle and attached it to the mug using 3 horizontal bands. I guess that after the mug was repaired it was involved in another bar brawl, as the bottom band is now missing.

This mocha mug with a similar form and from the same time period maintains its original handle.

Photo courtesy of 1stDibs